Posts Tagged With: good books

Dragons for Young People, Part Three: Eon

Eon book cover art

Image borrowed from http://www.alisongoodman.com.

For those of you who still come back to read these posts despite my lengthy absences over the last year, thank you! July and August merged together into a crazy journey consisting of a cross-country road trip to a classical teacher’s conference, a week with relatives while teaching a first grade Vacation Bible School class, a freelance ghostwriting project, and preparations for the classes I teach, which start up again on Monday. It has been a load, but a fun one!

I read Eon while staying with my relatives a month ago. I have a cousin who loves fantasy books and dragons, so it was on her shelf that I found this YA novel by Alison Goldman. I had thought that Seraphina would be the best YA dragon book addressed in this blog series, but I just might have been wrong—I finished Eon within a couple of days and snagged Eona, the sequel, to borrow when I returned home. With the ghostwriting and school prep, I still haven’t read it, but I’m excited to see whether it soars or flops as the next chapter of the story. Without further ado, though, here are the top 3’s of Eon:

 

Top 3 Stereotypes

1.  The secret that would prove deadly if discovered

Just like Seraphina, Eon has a secret: the back of the book reveals this one, so it’s no spoiler to say that the young boy Eon is actually a girl (Eona) in disguise. It is forbidden for females to become Dragoneyes (individuals who bond with one of the twelve energy dragons to represent them and share in their power), so only one or two servants and the master who is training her know her true identity. If she is discovered, she will likely be killed.

2. The commoner who falls in with royalty

This stereotype harkens back to both Seraphina and Dragon Slippers. Eon(a) once worked as a slave in a salt mine, but by the time this book reaches full swing, she suddenly becomes a favored member of the royal court and a friend to the emperor’s heir. All this happens just because her master found and trained her to become a Dragoneye—a decision on his part that I don’t remember ever learning the reasoning behind.

3. The youth with a powerful, unheard-of ability

Many stories for young readers wouldn’t exist if the main character wasn’t able to do something that set them apart—something that nobody else could do. In the case of Eon, Eon(a) has the ability to see all eleven of the lesser energy dragons. The dragons don’t exist in the physical realm, so only the individuals specifically bonded to each one can see that dragon. However, even before Eon(a) bonds unexpectedly with the red Mirror Dragon (who used to rule over the other dragons but has been missing for hundreds of years), she can see all of the dragons and is able to communicate with the Rat Dragon in particular. It’s a lot of unexplained power for one sixteen-year-old girl to have.

 

Top 3 Unique Points

1.  A refreshingly fresh take on sexuality

This was by far my favorite aspect of Goodman’s book. Many young adult stories of a girl in a man’s world put across one of two stereotypical worldviews: (1) that women are really the same as men and can do whatever men can do or (2) that women are out-and-out better than men. At first, I was afraid that Eon was telling a tale that would focus on the first stereotype. It was, after all, about a girl attempting to break into a male-only role. However, as the story progresses, Eon learns to accept her real identity as Eona and to quit denying her feminine side—not because it is “just as good as” or “better than”  masculinity, but because her gender has an important, unique function to fulfill in the power balance. The important roles of several eunuchs and a transgender “lady” of the court also open up deeper questions of what it really means to be male or female in a way that gently prompts thought without casting a judgment in any particular direction.

2. The unique Eastern setting

I’m happy whenever I find a fantasy book that doesn’t take place in a stereotypically Tolkien, Rowling, Lewis, or Paolini-esque world, and Eon made me happy in this regard. Goodman’s novel takes place in a land reminiscent of ancient China yet completely comfortable and almost familiar to me as a Western reader. She uses the ideas of zodiac-like dragons, martial arts-like fighting, sun (male)/moon (female) balance, symbol-writing, and an emperor’s court and harem in a world that somehow does not feel sharply foreign and strange like some authors’ attempts at Eastern tales. This land, with its political intrigue, social system, and Dragoneye lords, was quite believable and readable to me as a reader. I’m interested to see how she expands on it in Eona.

3. The elusive sense of something done right

I just can’t put my finger on what it is, but something about this book clicks. Is it the well-rounded, believable characters and the realistically messy relationships between them? Is it the world where there are enough complexities and details to make it seem real and alive without including the extra side plots, character information, or confusing twists that make books vague and unclear? Is it the first-person voice that gives us insight into Eon(a)’s mind and character while painting a clear, compelling, and easy-to-read picture of the world around her?  Whatever it is, I have to applaud Alison Goodman for a book done well.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, Eon is a book that I absolutely recommend. It’s more for teens (or adults who enjoy reading good books about teens) than for younger children, but I think that anyone could read and enjoy it. If you live in the UK, note that you may find this book published under the title The Two Pearls of Wisdom or Eon: Rise of the Dragoneye. The first chapter is available to read on Alison Goodman’s site at http://www.alisongoodman.com.au/e.html.  If you have already read this book, I would love to hear if you enjoyed it as much as I did and can shed light on what that elusive “something” is that makes this book hit the spot!

Categories: Fantasy Literature | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Summer Reading–Can you recommend any dragon titles?

old books photo

Are any of your old favorites about dragons?
Image from Wikimedia Commons

I apologize for the delay of this post—I had a job interview yesterday, so there were things besides dragons on my mind. I’ll try to stick closer to schedule next week; regular posting is important to me!

Wednesday was the first day of summer, and I realized that I haven’t done nearly as much reading as I would like. I was refreshing my summer (and future) to-read list yesterday, and found a lot of ambitious goals there, from the classic unabridged Les Miserables to thousands and thousands of pages’ worth of adventure in Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series. I haven’t decided whether I should start by tackling these masterpieces for the first time or by revisiting shorter favorites, but what I do know is that I’ll be doing a lot of dragon reading to keep the dragons coming to Dragon Crossing.

I have a list of dragon-related books to reread, like the My Father’s Dragon books, The Hobbit, and Eragon, as well as ones I’ve never read, such as Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series. My list is growing, but it is still small, so I would love your suggestions.

What are your favorite books dealing with dragons, and what are some others that you wish hadn’t been written? Were there any children’s books that made you a fan of dragons, as there were for me, or did you learn to love them as a teen or an adult? I welcome your suggestions as I add Dragon Crossing fodder to my summer to-read list.

Just for fun, what are YOU reading this summer?

Categories: Children's, Fantasy Fiction, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 5 Comments

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